Campaign: Between Federal Agencies

Direct the Federal Executive Boards (FEBs) to develop plans for collaborative projects that engage the public on regional issues

Most of the Federal government is actually not based in Washington, DC. Approximately 88 percent of all Federal employees work outside the National Capital Region. Federal programs have their impact largely through the actions of the field representatives of the departments and agencies. The Federal Executive Boards are a forum for communication and collaboration among Federal agencies outside of Washington, DC. The ...more »

Submitted by (@joegoldman)

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25 votes
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Campaign: Between Federal, State, and Local Governments

Convene a discussion on alternatives for the storage and disposal of spent reactor fuel.

Convene a discussion on alternatives for the storage and disposal of spent reactor fuel. With the storage disposal mechanism at Yucca Mountain off the table and a desire to use nuclear power to reduce carbon use, there is an opportunity to demonstrate the value of public participation and collaboration. This idea was developed by Federal managers at a conference on March 30-31, called Champions of Participation, which ...more »

Submitted by (@joegoldman)

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25 votes
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Campaign: Between Federal, State, and Local Governments

Create a national disaster recovery framework that identifies how the federal government will work across federal agencies

Create a national disaster recovery framework that identifies how the federal government will work across federal agencies and in cooperation with state and local government as well as the nonprofit and private sector. We have a National Response Framework but there is no national framework for long-term recovery and rebuilding. Ideas to develop such a framework are in the initial stages at FEMA/DHS. This idea was ...more »

Submitted by (@joegoldman)

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25 votes
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Campaign: Do-It-Yourself Government

Train skilled community organizers to strengthen our democracy.

Invest (and encourage others to invest) in community organizers to achieve greater “participation” and “collaboration” in government. This will increase transparency in government and strengthen our democracy. Investing in new technologies is important, but “Tools don't build houses. Carpenters build houses," explains Marshall Ganz, who has been credited as the architect of President Obama's field campaign. Who knows? ...more »

Submitted by (@kim000)

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24 votes
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Campaign: Making Government Operations More Open

Let's Be Clear on the Terminology about "Public Engagement"

We need to better define the terms that we are using in order to have a better discussion about how we achieve Open Government. If we all have different ideas about what is (and is not) "public engagement" or "transparency" or (insert buzzword here), then we will have a hard time reaching consensus about how to go forward. (This is the lesson from "The Tower of Babel".) For example: "Public Engagement" -- If ...more »

Submitted by (@stephenbuckley)

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19 votes
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Campaign: New Strategies and Techniques

Dynamic Self-Governance (DSG)

Dynamic Self-Governance (DSG) is a way to organize informal groups, businesses of any size, and governmental agencies. DSG uses systems theory and cybernetics to create enterprises that function EXTREMELY well, AND treat people as human beings. The key to DSG is that the Dutch engineer who developed it 4 decades ago came up with a way to keep all participants equal in power: Consent decision-making for policy decisions. ...more »

Submitted by (@teddidread)

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16 votes
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Campaign: Rulemaking

Repairing the regulatory damage from the Bush era

For the eight years of the Bush administration, the political appointees in the departments and agencies were tasked with creating an enduring legacy of rules that benefit commercial interests over the public interest. Which was to be expected, when James Watts' alcolytes ran Interior, and former pesticide lobbyists were making policy regarding pesticide regulation. That was part of the general pattern of placing people ...more »

Submitted by Unsubscribed User

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15 votes
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Campaign: Making Government Operations More Open

Establish Stakeholder Perspectives

I'm using this approach in the city of Portland and have used it with geographically dispersed and local organizations (communities). The first step is to build the stakeholder matrix by identifying the stakeholder groups, and their interests. Measurements are developed that support the interests. By considering all the major stakeholder groups a balance set of measurements can be established. It is very important ...more »

Submitted by (@john005)

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13 votes
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Campaign: New Strategies and Techniques

Open all decisions to everyone; get rid of professional politicians

Many institutions are opening up the decision-making process to the entire internet community. The government is one of the slowest to adopt this model. Of course, it would take a lot of thought and planning to get it right, but projects like the Metagovernment and Whitehouse2 are already figuring out the details. In fact, we could start adopting their software in the smallest government agencies and gradually work our ...more »

Submitted by (@department)

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13 votes
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Campaign: Public-Private Partnerships

National Idea Bank (proposed by Florida not me)

This is what we really need - an idea bank that the government can draw inspiration from. A bill to create one was passed in the Florida House but didn't make it through the Senate. Since we're talking about a National Idea Bank it seems like the U.S. government should really be the entity that supports the idea.

Submitted by (@longshot9999)

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13 votes
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Campaign: Public-Private Partnerships

Open Government Dialogue

I posted this as a comment but decided it really needed to be out front where people will notice it. So here it is. Here's an interesting side note. At this time 14,161 people have registered on this forum. Out of all those members 10 members have contributed more than 10 percent of the ideas. If you categorize the ideas, counting all the birth control ones as a single idea for example, then those 10 members have ...more »

Submitted by (@longshot9999)

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13 votes
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Campaign: Making Data More Accessible

Federal, State and Local Data Consolidation

In the old days, information was a one-way avenue; government would distribute information to news and media outlets that then added their political or demographic agenda and redistributed it to the general public in the form of censored TV newscasts, radio shows and other legacy media outlets. Welcome to the 21st century and to a world driven by information technology shared and crowdsourced by social media such as ...more »

Submitted by Unsubscribed User

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12 votes
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